Crown Receives the Diamond Pin Award

This weekend was very exciting for Crown Automotive. Our owner, Miles Schnaer, had the honor of traveling to Wolfsburg, Germany to accept the prestigious Diamond Pin Award! Crown Automotive was selected, as well as only a handful of other candidates from the U.S. to receive this award. It is only given to those dealerships that have shown outstanding customer service in both service and sales. Miles, and the rest of Crown Automotive, are all so proud to have received this award, and would like to thank all of our wonderful customers for helping us along the way! We certainly could NOT have done it without you!

 

IMG_4483

Advertisements

Volkswagen plans $40 billion investment in EVs over next five years, will introduce 15 new cars worldwide

Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/news/vw-plans-big-electric-future-article-1.3681253

Volkswagen plans $40 billion investment in EVs over next five years, will introduce 15 new cars worldwide

Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Front Right

Volkswagen plans to invest approximately $40 billion for the next five years, and aims to produce a million electric-powered vehicles by 2025.

Volkswagen wants you to stop thinking about dirty diesel when you think of their cars. Instead, start thinking about clean and powerful electric vehicles, because it intends to become the world’s foremost producer of EV mobility.

According to press reports out of the company’s global headquarters in Wolfsburg, the plan would see the automaker invest approximately $40 billion for the next five years in electric innovation and autonomous technology, culminating in the production of 1 million electric-powered vehicles by 2025. For U.S. consumers, that may also mean expanded investment in their Chattanooga production facility.

The expectation, according to Bloomberg News, is that VW will sell 100,000 hybrid and all-electric vehicles globally in three years, with its sights set on eventually overtaking Tesla as king of electric hill. On that score, Volkswagen has some catching up to do, as Tesla has pointed to 2020 as the year it will sell a million vehicles.

The I.D. Crozz Concept SUV previews an anticipated EV production model due for sale in the U.S. by 2020.

VW isn’t worried: As Hinrich J. Woebcken, head of Volkswagen Group of America said in a statement, the automaker has the global production capability and scale to quickly catch up. “In order to make EVs cost competitive, electric vehicles have to be built at scale, and Volkswagen has the potential to deliver global scale in EVs quickly,” said Woebcken. “We stand for making electric cars affordable; as we like to say, we build cars for millions, not millionaires.”

Volkswagen is making a strong start with the development of its I.D. branded vehicle range. As seen at the 2017 L.A. Auto Show, the lineup includes at least three models based on the same modular electric chassis, one that VW says is designed to handle mainstream electric vehicle requirements such as maximum range and power. While 15 total electric/hybrid vehicles are promised worldwide, for now the U.S. will see their first from the I.D brand in 2020. That’s the I.D. Crozz SUV, with the I.D. Buzz following in 2022. The original I.D. hatchback concept revealed last year will be sold in Europe.

As an all-wheel-drive SUV, the I.D. Crozz previews the next-gen VW electric vehicle approach, with an anticipated EV driving range of up to 300 miles and featuring the automaker’s I.D. Pilot self-driving system concept (planned for production in 2025).

The I.D. Buzz Concept has a production date of 2022, and a design that looks like the Type 2 Microbus.

The concept boasts two electric motors that deliver an anticipated 302 horsepower; VW says that the battery pack will be placed in the floor of the vehicle for optimum weight balance. They also claim that said battery pack will recharge to 80 percent in 30 minutes, when using a 150 kWh charger.

It’s not as if VW has ever rolled out a Bus concept to tease enthusiasts, right? This time, it’s the real deal, as there seems to be a strategic plan behind reinvigorating the happy days of flower power. Originally debuted at the Detroit Auto Show, the I.D. Buzz Concept has a production date of 2022 and a design that looks like the Type 2 Microbus.

From there things get modern quite quickly, with LED headlights, 22-inch wheels, and mechanical features similar to the I.D. Crozz such as I.D. Pilot, and two electric motors that produce 369 horsepower and a range of nearly 300 miles. Both vehicles are slated for sale in the U.S., Canada, Europe and China.

Daily Drive-Thru: Volkswagen Tiguan gets R-Line package; Audi’s pre sense side system and more

Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/amp/autos/news/vw-tiguan-r-line-package-audi-a8-pre-sense-side-article-1.3663233

Daily Drive-Thru: Volkswagen Tiguan gets R-Line package; Audi’s pre sense side system and more

NEWS

Volkswagen announces R-Line Appearance Package for 2018 Tiguan

2018 Volkswagen Tiguan R-Line Front Quarter
Powering the 2018 Tiguan R-Line is the same turbocharged four-cylinder engine, producing 184 horsepower and 221 lb-ft of torque.IMAGE BY: VOLKSWAGEN

If getting a much needed redesign wasn’t enough to make the Tiguan an enticing proposition, Volkswagen gives the crossover some sporty flair with a newly available package debuting for 2018.

Volkswagen’s R-Line ™ Appearance Package makes its way into the 2018 Tiguan, giving it R-Line accents, trims, and dressings both inside and out. Unfortunately, none of these sporty finishes translates to improved powertrain performance (something this SUV needs). If you want to give your Tiguan crossover more aggressive styling, it can be had for the SEL and SEL Premium trims.

Click here to find out more about the Tiguan’s R-Line Package.

Video: 2019 Audi A8 lifts suspension if it detects side crash

In an impending lateral collision at more than 15.5 mph, the Audi AI active suspension raises the body on the side exposed to the danger by up to 3.1 inches.
In an impending lateral collision at more than 15.5 mph, the Audi AI active suspension raises the body on the side exposed to the danger by up to 3.1 inches.

All the autonomous braking, lane-keep assist and traffic jam pilot systems in the world may work as intended, but there’s no guarantee that they’ll prevent every single possible accident.

Prepared for the inevitable when it arrives, Audi’s new 2019 A8 has a new pre sense side technology, which lifts the suspension on the side of the car in less than a second before getting T-boned. This helps to divert impact from the door and cabin to the frame of the car, preventing injury to those inside.

Learn about the 2019 Audi A8’s new safety feature here.

REVIEW

First Drive: 2018 BMW X3 xDrive30i

NYDN_2018-BMW-X3-Dark-Brown-Front-Quarter-Left
Flared nostrils, squinty-eyed LED headlamps and stretched wheelbase notwithstanding, the best view provided by the 2018 BMW X3 is out the windshield on a curvy piece of road.IMAGE BY: RON SESSIONS

When it comes to sporty, luxury SUVs, BMW has the segment covered on all fronts thanks to the introduction of its newest crop of crossovers. One of those getting a major redo is the X3 midsize crossover, which is derived from the 3 series platform.

Daily News Autos contributing writer Ron Sessions finds out how well the top-selling 3 series’ parts translate to more bulging dimensions in the X3 xDrive30i. Does that turbo four-pot sing as sweet a song?

He writes that while this Bimmer certainly looks the part, it’s definitely priced like one too. All those enticing add-ons tick the price up fast and completely blow your budget before you can say “Efficient Dynamics.”

Volkswagen Is Going to Start Making Electric Cars in the U.S.

By Geoffrey Smith

5:58 AM EST
Volkswagen (VLKAY, -2.10%) will likely start making electric vehicles in the U.S. by 2023, according to plan unveiled Thursday.

Herbert Diess, head of the VW brand, told a press conference Thursday that although the company hadn’t yet taken a formal decision, “Chattanooga is our first choice” for making EVs destined for the North American market.

Chattanooga is home to VW’s only U.S. plant and has been earmarked for a wholesale expansion since the company’s diesel emissions scandal erupted in 2015.

ReadVW Has an $82 Billion Plan to Be a Leader in Electric Cars

Last month, Volkswagen’s board approved plans to invest some 34 billion euros ($41 billion) over the next five years in electric mobility and autonomous driving capabilities, with the intention of being the world’s biggest electric carmaker by 2025. The group, which also owns the Audi, Porsche, Bentley and Skoda brands, aims to be making 1 million electric cars a year by 2025.

VW’s shares have been on a tear this year due to rocketing growth in China and the growing confidence that the company has put the worst of Dieselgate behind it (even if related charges still wiped out its operating profit in the first three quarters of this year, and further charges from civil actions in Europe seem likely).

In November, its stock climbed above the pre-Dieselgate level for the first time. Central to that performance is improving profitability at the VW brand. On Thursday, Diess said the brand’s operating margin would rise to between 4% and 5% in the medium-term, more than double what it has been in recent years, and a nudge up from its previous target of 4%.

ReadVolkswagen Executive Pleads Guilty in Diesel Emissions Scandal

In part, that’s due to cost cuts that the company has only been able to push through since the Dieselgate scandal. It has shed 3,800 jobs this year and aims to lose 23,000 by natural attrition by 2020. But it’s also been helped by a rising proportion of higher-margin vehicles such as the Atlas SUV. Dies said the company will also bring a redesigned Touareg and an all-new T-Cross to market next year.

“With SUVs, we are earning the money we need to fund the shift towards electric mobility,” Diess said, although he cautioned: “We have completed the first five kilometers of a marathon. We are all aware of the challenges that lie ahead of us.”

 

Volkswagen Shares Rise as World’s Second-Largest Carmaker Details New Investment

Volkswagen AG (VLKAY) shares were one of the top gainers in Frankfurt Monday after the world’s second-largest automaker said it would pump more than $25 billion in new investment cash into its main car brand over the next five years and lifted its near-term sales guidance.

The moves come as part of the German group’s broader €72 billion ($84.7 billion) investment overhaul designed to enhance its post emissions-cheating scandal recovery and position itself in key markets in Europe and around the world. Last week, VW said it had earmarked €10 billion for investment in electric car production in China in order to fund the launch of 40 new hybrid and all-electric vehicles, including 15 new models over the next two to three years.

“The investment package which has now been adopted will give a decisive boost to the largest product and technology offensive in the history of the brand,” said VW brand CEO Herbert Diess Saturday when the new plans were unveiled.

VW said it sees group revenues rising at least 25% from last year’s record of €217 billion by 2020, a 5 percentage point improvement from its previous forecast. Operating profits, the company said, will rise by more than 25% over the same period.

VW’s ordinary shares were marked 3.15% higher in Frankfurt and changing hands at €165.55 each, the highest since Nov. 1 and extending their year-to-date advance to around 17.8%.

The Wolfsburg, Germany-based carmaker said most of the cash — €14 billion — would be invested in its domestic market.

VW catches come good news.
VW catches come good news.

VW expects to sell 400,000 so-called new energy vehicles, or NEV’s, in China by 2020 and was targeting 1.5 million per year by 2025, said Heizman. The company, which operates in China through a partnership with state-owned Anhui Jianghuai Automobile Group, will start electric vehicle production in China the first half of 2018.

China’s government, in September, detailed a concerted push to reduce the number of petrol driven vehicles on its road and set out penalties for manufacturers whose NEV output is less than 10% of their total in China by 2019, rising to 12% by 2020.

The moves follow sustained pressure for European automakers over the summer and autumn months after the European Commission confirmed it will study a report that linked several of the country’s biggest brands to a decades-long program of collusion on technology costs and emissions controls.

The Commission said it had “received information on this matter”, along with Germany’s Federal Cartel Office, but noted it was “premature at this stage to speculate further.”

The statement followed a report from Germany’s Der Speigel magazine which said that carmakers including Volkswagen, Daimler AG (DDAIY) and BMW AG (BMWYY) , may have met and colluded for as many as two decades on issues such as technology costs, strategy and diesel engine emissions controls. If proven true, the EU could fine the automakers as much as 10% of their collective annual sales, a figure which could result in a penalty of as much as €50 billion ($58.3 billion).

Germany’s Cartel Office said it had looked into the industry last year as part of an investigation into possible collusion in steel use but didn’t mention any ongoing probes related to the Spiegel allegations

Volkswagen Shares Rise as World’s Second-Largest Carmaker Details New Investment

Volkswagen AG (VLKAY) shares were one of the top gainers in Frankfurt Monday after the world’s second-largest automaker said it would pump more than $25 billion in new investment cash into its main car brand over the next five years and lifted its near-term sales guidance.

The moves come as part of the German group’s broader €72 billion ($84.7 billion) investment overhaul designed to enhance its post emissions-cheating scandal recovery and position itself in key markets in Europe and around the world. Last week, VW said it had earmarked €10 billion for investment in electric car production in China in order to fund the launch of 40 new hybrid and all-electric vehicles, including 15 new models over the next two to three years.

“The investment package which has now been adopted will give a decisive boost to the largest product and technology offensive in the history of the brand,” said VW brand CEO Herbert Diess Saturday when the new plans were unveiled.

VW said it sees group revenues rising at least 25% from last year’s record of €217 billion by 2020, a 5 percentage point improvement from its previous forecast. Operating profits, the company said, will rise by more than 25% over the same period.

VW’s ordinary shares were marked 3.15% higher in Frankfurt and changing hands at €165.55 each, the highest since Nov. 1 and extending their year-to-date advance to around 17.8%.

The Wolfsburg, Germany-based carmaker said most of the cash — €14 billion — would be invested in its domestic market.

VW catches come good news.
VW catches come good news.

VW expects to sell 400,000 so-called new energy vehicles, or NEV’s, in China by 2020 and was targeting 1.5 million per year by 2025, said Heizman. The company, which operates in China through a partnership with state-owned Anhui Jianghuai Automobile Group, will start electric vehicle production in China the first half of 2018.

China’s government, in September, detailed a concerted push to reduce the number of petrol driven vehicles on its road and set out penalties for manufacturers whose NEV output is less than 10% of their total in China by 2019, rising to 12% by 2020.

The moves follow sustained pressure for European automakers over the summer and autumn months after the European Commission confirmed it will study a report that linked several of the country’s biggest brands to a decades-long program of collusion on technology costs and emissions controls.

The Commission said it had “received information on this matter”, along with Germany’s Federal Cartel Office, but noted it was “premature at this stage to speculate further.”

The statement followed a report from Germany’s Der Speigel magazine which said that carmakers including Volkswagen, Daimler AG (DDAIY) and BMW AG (BMWYY) , may have met and colluded for as many as two decades on issues such as technology costs, strategy and diesel engine emissions controls. If proven true, the EU could fine the automakers as much as 10% of their collective annual sales, a figure which could result in a penalty of as much as €50 billion ($58.3 billion).

Germany’s Cartel Office said it had looked into the industry last year as part of an investigation into possible collusion in steel use but didn’t mention any ongoing probes related to the Spiegel allegations.

From Eiffel Tower to high-tech storm

Source: https://www.volkswagen-media-services.com/en/detailpage/-/detail/From-Eiffel-Tower-to-high-tech-storm/view/5810936/7a5bbec13158edd433c6630f5ac445da?p_p_auth=rCgKTMd6

Wolfsburg, 07 November 2017

From Eiffel Tower to high-tech storm

Measuring aerodynamic drag – the story starts before the first wind tunnel

The inauguration of the Wind Tunnel Efficiency Center in November 2017 opens a new chapter in the history of aerodynamic drag measurement. This center is one of the world’s most advanced research facilities in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics and an expression of genuine engineering spirit. With the goal of combating aerodynamic drag with the most perfect shape possible, scientists have been perfecting design and technology for more than 11 decades and have regularly set milestones. From free fall to an artificial hurricane in the climate chamber – people have always written history in the battle for the perfect Cd value.

The first wind tunnels: a tower builder faces a headwind from Germany

The first wind tunnel was preceded by a free fall. The designer of the Eiffel Tower, Gustave Eiffel, was one of the first engineers to investigate the topic in 1905. For his research work, he used the his famous tower as an open-air laboratory. He dropped various metal plates from the second platform.

Laboratory for aerodynamic experiments in 1905: the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

Although the results were convincing, the method was strongly dependent on wind and weather. In 1909, Eiffel moved to the Laboratoire Aérodynamique Eiffel – a sort of open wind tunnel which he had designed. Ambient air was sucked into the tunnel by a turbine. However, because the measurement section was also exposed to temperature and pressure fluctuations from its surroundings, it soon reached its accuracy limits.

The situation was rather different with the measurement method developed by German engineer Ludwig Prandtl at about the same time. His aerodynamic investigations were chiefly concerned with aircraft design, which was the main focus in the early years of aerodynamics, and he opted for a closed loop in which the air was accelerated.

The father of aerodynamics at work: Dr. phil. Ludwig Prandtl (1875-1953)

His measurement principle not only provided more precise results; these tests were also repeatable. His test configuration soon became an international standard. Ludwig Prandtl is still considered to be the father of aerodynamics throughout the world.

Peace treaty provides a tailwind for the automobile

At the beginning of the 20th century, the main focus was still on aviation, a recent development. A large number of experiments with a view to identifying the right flow behavior provided rapid results and gave rise to bold visions. However, these became castles in the air in 1919: the Treaty of Versailles forbade Germany from producing airships and aircraft with more than 20 PS. Many aviation engineers lost their jobs but found new opportunities in the automobile industry.

At the beginning of the 1920s, most automobiles had Cd values similar to those of a garden shed. At the same time, pioneers like Paul Jaray or Edmund Rumpler developed striking vehicles born of necessity. With his prototypes, Paul Jaray defined the streamlined car. However, the most spectacular prototype was the Tropfenwagen designed by Edmund Rumpler, former manager of an aircraft factory.

The 1921 Rumpler Tropfenwagen

Rumpler uncompromisingly applied the knowledge he had gained in aircraft design to an automobile, presenting his Tropfenwagen in 1921. The streamlined shape not only allowed a very low fuel consumption but also ensured optimum efficiency. The power output of the engine was converted into speed in the most efficient way possible. In addition, the new design certainly stirred up the industry but it did not stir up any dust. What may seem to be unimportant today was a key consideration at a time when many roads were simply gravel tracks. Tests in the Volkswagen wind tunnel confirmed this droplet-shaped prototype’s low drag value in 1979. To this day, the Cd value of 0.28 which was measured can be considered to be exemplary.

400 km/h on the autobahn thanks to streamlining

In the 1930s, roads became better and vehicles became more powerful. Enthusiasm for motor racing grew throughout Europe. At racing circuits such as the Nürburgring or the Avus in Berlin, thousands of spectators cheered drivers on to faster and faster lap records. Optimized aerodynamic drag gave cars a decisive edge on the track. Strands of wool glued to the body provided new information in the wind tunnel. If the air flow remained constant, there was scarcely any movement of the strands. It is only when flow was interrupted that the strands waved backwards and forwards. In 1937, a further record was achieved. The Auto Union Type C racing car broke through the 400 km/h barrier not least because of its low drag value of 0.237. However, this was not on the racing circuit but on the Frankfurt-Heidelberg autobahn which had been closed for the purpose.

A Beetle sports model makes history in the wind tunnel

Soon afterwards, the automobile euphoria of engineers and industry was brought to an abrupt halt by the Second World War. Materials and machinery were needed for the war effort and were no longer available for fast vehicles on the autobahn.

During measurements made decades later in March 2003, a special VW Beetle sports version produced in 1947 thrilled the Volkswagen Research and Development team. In comparison with a standard Beetle produced at the same time, which had a rounded design intended mainly to ensure a spacious interior, the Volkhart V2 Sagitta not only looks but actually is more slippery. With a phenomenal drag coefficient of only about 0.22, the elegant sports coupe was a step ahead of the record racing cars of the 1930s.

The 1950s and 1960s

Beetle, tailfins and a new wind tunnel in Wolfsburg

However, the streamlined Sagitta was to remain an exception over the next few decades. In post-war Germany, cars mainly needed to be practical. The Beetle provided Germany with mobility and set off on its success story throughout the world. On the other side of the Atlantic, cars became larger and presented a more and more jagged appearance with giant tailfins. Thanks to cheap fuel and increasingly powerful engines, aerodynamic drag was of secondary importance, at least on production vehicles.

In Germany, Volkswagen took a ground-breaking step: 10 million Volkswagens had rolled off the production lines by 1965. According to the CEO at the time, Heinrich Nordhoff, the next 10 million were to be even better.

Wind tunnel construction site, 1964

To keep his promise, Nordhoff presented a unique wind giant to international trade journalists in December 1965.

Volkswagen 1600 TL. Press photo celebrating the inauguration of the wind tunnel on December 14, 1965

With its eight-meter-diameter fan and a rating of 2.6 megawatts, wind tunnel 1 could generate air speeds of up to 150 km/h – 30 km/h faster than a hurricane.

But that was not all: vehicle tests in sweltering desert heat or icy polar temperatures were now possible in Lower Saxony at any time of the year. The temperature in the climate air tunnel could be set precisely from minus 35 to plus 45 degrees Celsius, with relative humidity between five and 95 percent. Even sunlight could be simulated with special spotlights. At long last, developers could not only test the shape of a vehicle but also heating, air conditioning and the starting and operating behavior of engines under all types of climatic conditions in the Wolfsburg wind and weather machine. For many years, the combination of climate chamber and wind tunnel remained a technical innovation.

1966 advertising motif

The oil crisis poses new challenges for aerodynamics

Knowledge gained in the climate wind tunnel allowed significant improvements in the comfort and reliability of vehicles. It was in the wind tunnel that the lines of an iconic coupe produced at the end of the 1960s – the Karmann-Ghia with a Cd value of 0.39, were optimized. The strands of wool used to visualize air flow in the early days of the wind tunnel had long been replaced by steam. And the sensors used to measure the forces acting on a vehicle had become more and more accurate. From the late 1960s, computers were already used to analyze and process the values measured in the wind tunnel.

Following a number of oil price hikes, fuel efficiency once again became a key concern. In 1975, the Golf 1 had a Cd value of 0.41, which was a significant improvement over the Beetle (0.46). The second-generation (Cd value 0.34) and third-generation Golf (Cd value 0.30) outdistanced their ancestor even more comprehensively. This achievement is even more impressive in view of the fact that these vehicles also became increasingly spacious.

Into the new millennium with the one-liter car

To improve the test possibilities available, work on a second, smaller wind tunnel, thermal wind tunnel 2, started in Wolfsburg in 1985. In the 1980s and 1990s, vehicle designers were searching for the ideal compromise between vehicle size, performance and aerodynamic drag. Vehicles which were to sell in large numbers had to offer generous space and better performance than their predecessors. Their fuel consumption was also to be as low as possible. That was rather a tall order for automakers: after all, almost half the fuel used by a vehicle was needed to overcome drag.

Even though the theoretical calculation of air flows had been possible for some time using supercomputers, practical measurements in the wind tunnel remained essential. Smooth underbodies, new wing mirrors, flush glass surfaces and a number of other tricks were used to compensate for the growing frontal area of vehicles.

Thanks to smart design, the assumption that a high frontal area results in high drag can be disproved by a simple calculation. In 2005, the Golf Plus was 10 centimeters taller than the Golf V and its frontal area had therefore increased from 2.22 m² to 2.38 m². However modifications to the body allowed the Cd value of the Golf Plus to be reduced by 0.1 points. Fuel consumption only rose by 0.1 liters per 100 kilometers.

However an entirely different vehicle made in Wolfsburg proved that miraculously low consumption be achieved by a car that had been consistently designed in the wind tunnel.

A world premiere in 2011: XL1 production vehicle

Volkswagen presented the first drivable one-liter concept car to the public in 2002. The L1 prototype showed just how far a combination of consistently applied lightweight design, advanced engine technology and low aerodynamic drag could reduce fuel consumption. Among other features, the slippery shape with a Cd value of 0.159 was reached by using two seats positioned in tandem behind each other and a width of only 1.25 m. No rear-view mirrors were used. Instead, cameras provided a rear view for the driver. Even though the prototype and its successor, produced by VW in a small series from 2014 onwards, were certainly not family cars, the vehicle was fully equipped for everyday use, with an 80-liter cargo space, ESP, ABS and a variety of safety systems.

Into the future with the Wind Tunnel Efficiency Center

As a result of higher speeds and more stringent requirements, especially in the field of aeroacoustics, wind tunnel 1 was reaching its limits in the new millennium. The solution led to a major construction project; work on the new Wind Tunnel Efficiency Center started in 2014.

The new facility doubles the number of wind tunnels in Wolfsburg from two to four.

Source: Fritz Deufel Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH

In addition to the two existing wind tunnels, two new facilities were built within an area of 8,800 square meters. The objective was clearly defined. The new wind tunnels were to allow research and development work for further reductions in fuel consumption and COemissions across the vehicle fleet. In addition, the operating range of vehicles with conventional and electric powertrains was to be further improved. And the new wind tunnels themselves were to be especially energy-efficient and environmentally compatible.

The construction work took slightly less than four years and, by the fall of 2017, it was clear that the goal would be reached. One of the world’s most advanced wind tunnel centers has been created in Wolfsburg. The new facility allows wind speeds of up to 250 km/h and temperatures of up to 60°C. Advanced technologies such as a high-precision flat belt balance allow vehicle movements to be simulated as if they were on the road – for vehicles with power outputs up to 1,000 kW.

So the evolution of wind research continues. From Eiffel’s free fall, we have moved on to the search for the perfect sound. At least in terms of volume, the special acoustic insulation of the new aerodynamic/aeroacoustic wind tunnel calms the artificial hurricane to an almost silent breeze. Not only is it possible to reduce the noise level in the surroundings of a vehicle; the volume inside the vehicle itself can also be minimized. At a wind speed of 160 km/h in the aerodynamic/aeroacoustic wind tunnel, the volume is about as loud as in an office. People who are working on the future have earned a little rest.

More Stories abount the Wind Tunnel:

Aerodynamics and customers benefits

Factsheet